Life of the Author: Combat Assaults Outside of Cu Chi

Before self-publishing Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA Ronny Ymbras was a paratrooper who started with the 82nd Airborne and later went to fight with the 101st Screaming Eagles in Vietnam. Below are some of the photos from just outside of Cu Chi, Dec 67.




Combat Assaults Outside of Cu Chi Vietnam – 101st ’67

Vietnam_veterans_memorial_book_combat_assault
A view from above
Combat assault in formation
Combat assault in formation

 

Combat assault hopefully with Puff cover wet
Combat assault hopefully with Puff cover, wet
Wet rice paddies in the dry season
Wet rice paddies in the dry season
Ready to unload, not a hot LZ
Ready to unload, not a hot LZ
 Shrapnel is still warm from Artilery clearing the area before landing.
Shrapnel is still warm from Artillery clearing the area before landing.
ARVN local probably the interpreters helper.
ARVN local probably the interpreters helper.
M 79 and Willie Peter on patrol.
M 79 and Willie Peter on patrol.
It read that this person died in 1845.
It read that this person died in 1845. We hid behind many of these often
Discovered punji pit.
Discovered punji pit.
PFC plant second squad second Platoon B Co 1/502 Inf 101st Abn Div.
PFC plant second squad second Platoon B Co 1/502 Inf 101st Abn Div.
Ronny Ymbras hot and dry getting ready to dig.
Ronny Ymbras hot and dry getting ready to dig.
Digging a foxhole to hell The ground was so hard that The artillery would explode none would go down into the ground it would all stay above and along the ground quite deadly.
Digging a foxhole to hell The ground was so hard that The artillery would explode none would go down into the ground it would all stay above and along the ground quite deadly.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Book

Ronny Ymbras Speaks about a Bad Parachute Exit/Landing

On June 6th (D-day) 2015 Ronny and Matthew Ymbras went to St. Mere Eglise in Normandy, France where Ronny would take part in a reenactment jump at DZ Hemevez. A place where Ronny’s heroes jumped behind enemy lines in WWII.

The day of the jump was windy, and the jumpers were told to be careful and that some may get blown off of the DZ. Fortunately for Ronny although being blown into a backyard he landed in a flat area, the man that also fell into that backyard was not so luck. As you will see in the video below…

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Book

Life of the Author: Base Camp at Cu Chi

Before self-publishing Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA Ronny Ymbras was a paratrooper who started with the 82nd Airborne and later went to fight with the 101st Screaming Eagles in Vietnam. Below are some of the photos from his arrival at base camp in Cu Chi, Dec 67




Base Camp at Cu Chi Vietnam – 101st ’67

Fashionable flak jacket Cu Chi December 67
Bobby Olmos Bronx, New York supply clerk
Mess hall on fire. It seems like more people are running to the kitchen than away from it.
One of my best buds Charlie Menninger from Baltimore, Maryland. He got hit by a sniper bullet and I never saw him again until 20 years later. He later died of cancer in the early 2000’s RIP
Some recreation time
Christmas with most of 2nd squad 2nd platoon B Co 1/502 Inf 101st Abn Div Dec 67
Christmas dinner menu December 67
Ready for patrol
2nd platoon B CO 1/502 Inf ready for patrol
Top of the bunker on the perimeter 50 caliber no nonsense
Keep your head down Charlie




Life of the Author: Fort Campbell to Cu Chi, Vietnam

Before self-publishing Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA Ronny Ymbras was a paratrooper who started with the 82nd Airborne and later went to fight with the 101st Screaming Eagles in Vietnam. Below are some of the photos from his travel with the 101st Airborne Division from Fort Campbell to Cu Chi, Vietnam – Dec 67




En Route from Ft Campbell to Cu Chi, Vietnam

En route to Vietnam at Wake Island
Lt Bokus and I, next stop Philippines
Downtown Cu Chi
Kids fighting over candy on the side of the road
Searching hooches
Local grocery store with Spring Rolls
Papasan
Sites on the side of the road between Bien Hoa and Cu Chi
Telling the kids about Mickey Mouse
Local transport, water buffalo
On the way to market




Life of the Author – A Death I Lived [POEM]

Fifty years ago last week B Co 1/502 Inf 101st Abn Div was involved in an extreme friendly fire incident.

Thirteen of my Brothers were killed and 22 wounded.

While I was laid up in the 86th Evac hospital in Quin Nhon I started to constantly rethink a lot of things. En route back to LZ Sally, while traveling through Tuy Hoa the following words came together into a poem and here is the “Why Me” of survivor guilt.

Below is a scan of the original typed copy I made (I cannot find the penned original) written on a typewriter at division Hq rear at a later date in Bien Hoa.

-Ronny Ymbras

1/502 101st Abn – RVN 67/68

A pill, a gun, a knife , a dare,

A blast, a flash, a bomb, a scare,

I’ve died with my eyes shut tight,

Soon reopened by god’s love light,

A friend, companion. buddy or chum,

A mate, partner, pal or bum,

It’s in each thought and then I say,

My God I’ve lived to see another day…

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Book

A Vietnam Story – Friendly Fire isn’t Friendly… March 26 1968

 

While on patrol since early morning on a trail in the Ashau Valley, we encountered some small arms fire at our point. We were told to pull back 100 meters so support fire could drop a few rounds ahead of us. To pull back 100 meters with a company size group would have taken an hour or more. We walked for about 10-15 minutes.

 

We were walking along side of a stream which crossed the path often, some places the stream was 3 ft wide a 3 ft deep and in other places the stream was 15 ft wide and 3 inches deep. We dropped and laid back on our rucks in a wider area around where the water that was shallow and waited.

 

I remember hearing the mortars coming out of the tube from up on some fire base. Sound travels well in a quiet jungle.

 

Nine rounds.

 

Myself and others remember the sound of artillery volleys going off.

 

The first round landed about 50 meters out, then a second one was closer. I got my ass up and sat in a walk up dug up the bank of the stream. SSGT sat next to me and a few seconds later one hit right in front of us and a torso with a red smoke grenade popped flew through the air and landed on the SSGT next to me. He let out the most blood chilling scream ever I’ve ever heard. They kept exploding all around us and then the artillery hit a little ways off from our position.

 

I got up with my ears ringing and started to run up the trail to tell the command group to check fire. As I was running I had to cross the stream and as I went to jump a foot landed in the water in front of me. I thought a foot that small must be Scott’s… he was only 5’3′ our tunnel rat. I later found out it was not his.

 

When I got to the command group the Capt and 1st SGT were down as well as a few others. They had things under control so I ran back to my squad. The plt Leader LT Phillip Benn, his RTO Roger Link, my squad leader Sgt  Phillip Krek, Glen Hubbard, John Barns and Hoyle Terry were dead. There were numbers of wounded laying around. In the meantime the NVA  were probing us.

 

We set up some kind of perimeter to protect the rest of the guys. Nothing happened later from the enemy.

 

It was a bloody mess, chain saws had to be dropped in. Some of the guys were climbing trees to bend them over in order to rip them down with their bare hands before the saws came.

 

The brigade commander Col John Cushman dropped in to take out some wounded. I was on the last ship out, I lost my hearing in my one ear and only had a small cut on my forehead. In all 13 troopers died, some died of their wounds in Japan, 22 were wounded. 2nd squad 2nd platoon took the worst hit…

 

Some of us think this was covered up, notice no record of March 26 or 27 on the Daily Brigade Report. About 5 years ago I met the man who conducted the investigation of the event and he tried to convince me that the base plate slipped on the 4.2 mortars. I asked why did the artillery hit as well?

 

He asked “What artillery?”

 

We went back and forth, however other troopers remember the big guns raining down too.

 

From that day on I promised myself that I would reach out to the families of the Hero Brothers of mine, to tell them what great soldiers and people they were. As 47 years went by every one got older and I did not forget them. On Memorial Day 2015 I was driving my son Josh back to school near Boston when I saw a sign for the Massachusetts Vietnam Memorial on US 90.

 

We stopped in and the rest is history, the idea for our book was conceived.

I hope my brothers forgive me for taking so long to honor them. Two of them never saw the children that their wives had. That was the worst day of my life and the main reason I decided to publish the book “Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA”

 

RIP MY BROTHERS, MAY GOD BLESS YOU,,,,AATW,,,,AIRBORNE ALL THE WAY

 

Sgt Ronny Ymbras
B Co 1/502 Inf
101st Abn Div
RVN 67-68
To read more about this incident in more detail you may follow think link

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Life of the Author: Preparing for Nam at Fort Campbell

Before self-publishing Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA Ronny Ymbras was a paratrooper who started with the 82nd Airborne and later went to fight with the 101st Screaming Eagles in Vietnam. Below are some of the photos from his training at Fort Campbell




Ft Campbell, KY

B Company 1/502 barracks, 6am every morning
KP (kitchen police) back sink – Ronny Ymbras, Tom Schwarzman RIP cancer a few years ago, Steve “Scotty Scott RIP 7/21/16
Frank “Pineapple” Laika RIP 30 days to go Nov ’68
Ready for operations
Boarding the Huey UH-1
Combat Assault
All the young dudes on the 34 foot tower
Pineapple and I on the 34′ jump tower
Last formation at Fort Campbell
Last formation ending, heading to Nashvile for our last weekend stateside
B Company 1/502nd inf – 101st Airborne division
Sgt Striker the Screaming Eagle leading us to Vietnam




Life of the Author: Training at Fort Jackson and Fort Bragg before Nam

Before self-publishing Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA Ronny Ymbras was a paratrooper who started with the 82nd Airborne and later went to fight with the 101st Screaming Eagles in Vietnam. Below are some of the photos from his experiences at Ft Jackson and Ft Bragg




Ft Jackson SC

Tent City, FT Jackson SC fall 1967
Class mates in Wheeled Vehicle Mechanics school MOS 63-b20
Going to town, Columbia SC in Class A’s
Last holdover
Getting ready to go to Jump School

Fort Bragg NC

Ready to go at any moment…
Newspaper about the training exercise displayed in the following photos
fire!
Issued my M-16
Pope Air Force Base Ft Bragg NC
Ready to go
Out the door, opening shock over DZ Sicily
Full canopy, T-10 parachute
Drifting along over the DZ, enjoying the ride and the sites
PLF time (Parachute Landing Fall)
Nothing like getting dragged all over DZ Sicily
Looking down the barrel of the M-60
My idea of gun control, whoever has the guns is in control…
Training for Nam with the UH-1
Digging into our position, Foxhole time
Proud paratrooper home with my Jump Wings for the first time




Life of the Author: Jump School at Fort Benning

Before self-publishing Fallen Never Forgotten: Vietnam Memorials in the USA Ronny Ymbras was a paratrooper who started with the 82nd Airborne and later went to fight with the 101st Screaming Eagles in Vietnam. Below are some of the photos from his experiences at Fort Benning, Georgia




First day of jump school, Fort Benning GA April 1967
Instilling pride and confidence, and maybe a little stupidity. Who jumps out of a perfectly good airplane?
Four weeks of hell coming up
34 foot towers, with the first aid hut on standby
250 foot towers standing tall
Looking past the riser at the next stick coming out of a C119
Some guys always talked about pulling their reserve, notice it in the bottom right of the photo
Checking the wind direction on the DZ
I got my jump wings, standing tall and proud
We knew we were going soon to the NAM
Trying to live up to our history

Vietnam Veterans Memorial book: